Poll: Rural Americans Rattled By Opioid Epidemic; Many Want Government Help

Rural Americans are profoundly worried about the opioid crisis and their local economies and many are hoping government can help, according to a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. One-quarter of rural Americans say opioid and other drug abuse is the biggest problem that faces their local communities. A similar share, 21 percent, say economic concerns are the biggest problems in their areas. No other topic even comes close...

Read More

Not seeing the video? Click here.

Kirk Lombard is a firm believer that one of the best ways to show your love for the sea is to harvest and eat its bounty — responsibly.

Dozens of people are holding a Roman Catholic Mass in the underground basilica of Spain's Valle de los Caídos, the Valley of the Fallen. The vast complex outside Madrid includes a monument and a church that leads to the tomb of Spain's 20th century dictator, Gen. Francisco Franco. The cave-like place is dark and full of fascist-era architecture: rigid lines and imposing statues.

On a recent Saturday, Franco's tomb is covered in flowers with red-and-yellow ribbons depicting the Spanish flag. Several people kneel down and kiss the tomb.

Afghanistan will wait an extra week to hold elections in Kandahar, the large province where a Taliban attack killed the powerful police chief on Thursday. The violence came just two days before Afghan voters are slated to elect members of parliamentary seats.

The Afghan Independent Election Commission recommended postponing the vote during an emergency meeting that included President Ashraf Ghani and the heads of the country's intelligence and security agencies.

With new enforcement priorities under the Trump administration, Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents are taking aim at employers that knowingly hire unauthorized immigrants. The most recent — and largest — bust happened at a trailer manufacturing plant in northeast Texas.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

President Trump says he believes missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi is dead, telling The New York Times that his judgment is based on intelligence reports "coming from every side."

If Saudi Arabia is responsible, the consequences will be "very severe," he told the Times.

Vice President Pence also used strong language on Thursday while speaking with reporters in Colorado.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

An American graduate student will be allowed to study in Israel after Israel's Supreme Court overturned a lower court ruling barring her from entering the country over her past involvement in a boycott movement.

Lara Alqasem, 22, of Florida, had been detained at Ben-Gurion International Airport since arriving on Oct. 2. She has a student visa from an Israeli consulate and had enrolled to study human rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Authorities accused her of supporting the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement, known as BDS, against Israel.

Dr. Reginald Archibald was a pediatric specialist of growth and maturation. For decades, he treated children too small for their age at The Rockefeller University Hospital in New York. Now, that hospital is saying he abused at least one of them — and possibly others.

Pages

Events: Oct. 19 - 25

Walks and Halloween themed events are happening around town as well as a community health needs assessment, abstract arts at the Art Center Waco and the BOSS conference from the Central Texas African American Chamber of Commerce. Ashley Bean Thornton is back with this weeks edition of Act Locally Waco.

Read More

Saturday at 11am with encores Sunday at 10am and 7pm