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Meet Philadelphia Flyers' New Mascot

4 hours ago

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Animal from "The Muppets," a "ZZ Top" beard - these are some of the ways that Philadelphia Flyers fans have described Gritty, their team's new fuzzy, orange mascot with googly eyes.

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Should you happen to be planning a trip to North Korea, you'll have a few logistical hurdles to clear. There is the fact that the State Department bans U.S. passport holders from traveling there.

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How Michael Ovitz shifted Hollywood's balance of power

4 hours ago

"Jurassic Park," "Shindler’s List," "Rain Man" and "Ghostbusters" are all movies that might never have been made were it not for a guy named Michael Ovitz. He grew up over the hills from Hollywood in the San Fernando Valley, started working in the entertainment business giving studio tours on Universal's back lot while he was still in high school and eventually became one of the most powerful people in Hollywood. CAA, the talent agency he co-founded and ran for 20 years is still a force in the industry, representing Hollywood A-listers like Meryl Streep, George Clooney and Tom Hanks.

Violent crime stayed essentially flat last year, according to statistics just released by the FBI. Those crimes were down by 0.2 percent last year, after a sharp increase of more than 5 percent the year before.

That means violent crime has essentially plateaued at a level higher than the record lows of a few years ago — but is still substantially lower than the high rates of the 1980s and 1990s.

Novartis moves away from mass-market drugs

4 hours ago

Drugmaker Novartis announced it's cutting more than 2,000 jobs — most of them in Europe — as part of a global restructuring. The company plans to focus on producing and selling more innovative drugs, but these specified medicines require lots of research and carry higher price tags.

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You don’t have to travel Washington, D.C. or peruse some 838 miles of shelves to visit the Library of Congress.

Among the library’s 167 million items are rare books, photographs, historical recordings, baseball cards and even some human hair. Thousands of elements are added every day and millions of entries can be viewed online. 

“It’s a treasure chest,” said Carla Hayden, the current librarian of Congress,  on this week’s Make Me Smart. “It’s the ultimate in terms of a library.”

83: The Sanctuary of Smart

5 hours ago

This is a really special episode, folks. We're talking with Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress. She's the first woman and the first African-American to hold the job, presiding over some 167 million items in the Library. It  may just be the least-partisan part of Congress, an invaluable public resource that endures in an age of polarization and misinformation. We'll talk with Hayden about some of the important, obscure and wild stuff held in that building, and online, and how she's working to keep the Library relevant and useful for a new generation.

Justice Department official John Gore must sit for questioning by attorneys for the lawsuits over the citizenship question his department requested to be added to the 2020 census, a three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled.

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani accused the United States on Tuesday of trying to overthrow his government, rejecting bilateral talks after President Donald Trump predicted stepped-up U.S. sanctions would get Tehran to negotiate over its nuclear program.

Addressing world leaders at the U.N. General Assembly, Rouhani accused the Trump administration of violating “state obligations” from the Obama administration by withdrawing from the 2015 nuclear deal that Iran signed with the United States and five other major powers.

Updated at 5:20 p.m. ET

Twenty-seven years after testifying that then-Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her, Anita Hill says she believes the upcoming hearing on an alleged sexual assault by the current nominee "cannot be fair and thorough."

As it stands now, the hearing cannot provide the senators "with enough information to reach a reasonable conclusion," Hill tells NPR.

Tracking Down Fake Videos

5 hours ago

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Also in all Tech Considered, we continue our look this month at the many ways tech can be used to influence or undermine democracy. Today - deep fake videos.

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U.N. General Assembly: Day 1

5 hours ago

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We turn now to Jens Stoltenberg. He's the secretary general of NATO, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. And he was at the U.N. for President Trump's remarks. We asked him what he thought of the speech and Trump's "America First" approach.

A report on clerical sexual abuse in Germany released Tuesday found thousands of cases of sexual abuse of minors by clerics in the Catholic Church between 1946 and 2014 — and warns that the actual number is surely higher.

The study looked at more than 38,000 sets of personnel records from the country's dioceses, as well as criminal records and interviews with those who say they were abused and clerics accused of abuse.

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