Marketplace

Weekdays 6pm
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

Award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine on business and economics news "for the rest of us."  Hosted by Kai Ryssdal, award-winning Marketplace is public radio's daily magazine of business and economics. Marketplace takes a fresh approach to business news covering  listeners from wallet to Wall Street. 

The Hankamer School of Business at Baylor University and Mc Lane Intelligent Solutions are local sponsors of Marketplace on KWBU.

For program sponsorship information, contact Bill Leek at 254-710-4472.

(Markets Edition) With the Chinese yuan falling, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin attempted to warn China of taking part in “competitive devaluation” of the currency. Then, we check on the markets with Jeffery Cleveland, chief economist with Payden & Rygel in Los Angeles. Finally, we look into networking. Before, connections could be made over a round of golf.

Inside Tsuda Shoten — a fish processing plant in Kamaishi, Japan — large machines whir and clang, connected by networks of chutes and rollers that shuttle tons of fish around the building. While much of the work is automated, many tasks still need human hands. That’s where workers like Nguyen Ti Thanh, 26, come in.

The high economic toll of mental illness

Oct 10, 2018

Mental disorders are estimated to cost the global community nearly $2.5 trillion each year — and those costs are increasing.

Unlike costly physical illnesses like cancer, where expenses are largely hospital-based, mental health costs are often indirect, such as not being able to work.

LinkedIn's co-founder breaks down "blitzscaling"

Oct 10, 2018

(U.S. Edition) We check in on the decline of the yuan, the national currency of China. Shaun Rein, the managing director of the China Market Research Group, told us more. A global summit on mental health concludes Wednesday in a bid to secure money and treatment comparable to other health issues. Worldwide, mental disorders cost governments almost $2.5M per year.

The LinkedIn co-founder on "Blitzscaling" a company while mitigating risk

Oct 10, 2018

“Don’t focus on early revenue, measuring your long-term value or your customers” might not be the advice a new entrepreneur would expect. But Reid Hoffman, co-founder of LinkedIn, says if your business idea is a worthy one, “don’t sweat it.” Just focus on getting big quickly.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … A day after it downgraded its forecast for global growth next year, the International Monetary Fund is out with a new warning Wednesday about what it calls "dangerous undercurrents" threatening the world economy. Then, more than half a million people have been urged to evacuate their homes in the southeastern part of the U.S. as Hurricane Michael prepares to make landfall. That’s just weeks after storms ravaged Indonesia and the Carolinas.

The next generation of wireless technology, 5G, could be a huge deal. The speed and the number of devices that can be connected could spawn new businesses we haven't even thought of yet. Last year chipmaker Qualcomm and tech research firm IHS Technology put out a report that said 5G could enable $12 trillion in economic output across the world by 2035 and add some 22 million jobs. The report compared 5G to electricity. Compare that to 4G, which, just in the U.S., contributed about half a trillion dollars to the economy in 2016.

Why the race to 5G is a bet on a multi-trillion dollar economic impact

Oct 10, 2018

The next generation of wireless technology, 5G, could be a huge deal. The speed — and the number of devices that can be connected — could spawn new businesses we haven't even thought of yet. Last year chipmaker Qualcomm and tech research firm IHS Technology put out a report that said 5G could enable $12 trillion in economic output across the world by 2035 and add some 22 million jobs. The report compared 5G to no less than ... electricity. Compare that to 4G, which, just in the U.S., contributed about half a trillion dollars to the economy in 2016.

Duke Energy CEO on the future of energy

Oct 9, 2018

With the rush of technological change, evermore severe storms and the push for renewable energy sources, this is not the easiest time to run an energy company. Yet Lynn Good does just that, having taken over Duke Energy as CEO back in 2013. Duke is now one of the largest energy companies in the United States, with more than 7 million customers in the Midwest and Southeast.  

For Good, the biggest challenge in leading an energy company is thinking about the future and the speed at which the world is changing.

IMF forecasts slower global growth

Oct 9, 2018

The International Monetary Fund said Tuesday it's shaving off some of its earlier optimism about world economic growth over the next couple years. It has downgraded its growth forecast for this year from 3.9 percent to 3.7 percent, and for next year, the IMF has ticked the world's growth down from 2.7 percent to 2.5 percent. The forecast took some of the wind out of U.S. and Chinese economic expansion, too, saying both countries would grow more slowly than previously thought. So what could be dragging us down in a year's time?

R.I.P., Google Plus

Oct 9, 2018

We hardly used ye. Google is phasing out its social platform Google Plus after a massive data breach. We look at how this could affect Google’s business model. Also on today's show, the International Monetary Fund predicted in its global economic forecast that trade disputes and turbulent emerging markets will slow global economic growth. And, are electric scooters all that bad, or are they a sign of where our transportation system is headed? A report on the electric scooter craze from Los Angeles.

Credit card interest rates are rising

Oct 9, 2018

A report out today from Creditcards.com shows that credit card interest rates are on the rise. The average rate is just over 17 percent, up from about 16.15 percent this time last year and 15.22 percent in 2016.

The reason? The Federal Reserve has been hiking interest rates since 2015. That means banks have been paying more to borrow money, and they’re passing that cost on to their customers, including credit card borrowers, said Lucia Dunn, professor emeritus at Ohio State University.

85: Expl4inathon

Oct 9, 2018

It's time for another Explainathon, the biannual tradition when we put Kai and Molly to the test: In 30 minutes, they'll try to answer as many of your questions as possible. It's going to be tough, because this might just be our widest-ranging 'thon yet: Gamers! Trade wars! Gas prices! Bots on the trading floor! Plus, Kai and Molly will try to stump each other.

Coin-operated gumball machines aren't as common as they used to be. With sales slowly dwindling over the years and high domestic sugar prices, America's sole remaining gumball maker has been branching out to stay afloat.  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

(Markets Edition) New numbers show the benefits of aggressively helping young people finish school and find jobs. A study followed two groups, both ages 16 to 24, on their journeys. Then we dive into the markets, where the latter half of this week signals the beginning of a new season of sorts for market participants. Also, we check in on the last American gumball company standing, Ford Gum and Machine Company, which has been around for more than a century.

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