Jason Wingard, the dean of the School of Professional Studies at Columbia University, answers listener questions about the future of workplaces.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Imam Mohammad Altahir of the Islamic Center in Wyoming and Lane Moore of the Northwest Louisiana Baptist Association about pandemic's effects on religious practices.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Imam Mohammad Altahir of the Islamic Center in Wyoming and Lane Moore of the Northwest Louisiana Baptist Association about pandemic's effects on religious practices.

The city attorney of Los Angeles announced Wednesday that his office is suing Wellness Matrix Group for allegedly engaging in a "fraudulent scheme" related to the COVID-19 pandemic that was both "sophisticated" and "wide ranging."

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

One hundred thousand - that is how many people are now known to have been killed in the U.S. by a virus few had ever heard of just a few months ago. With less than 5% of the world's population, the U.S. accounts for nearly one-third of all known coronavirus fatalities. NPR's David Welna looks at this grim milestone and at where the American death toll may be headed.

DAVID WELNA, BYLINE: It took barely four months for the number of lives lost in the U.S. to the COVID-19 pandemic to reach the 100,000 mark.

A group of House Democrats introduced a bill Wednesday that would push back major deadlines for the 2020 census as requested by the U.S. Census Bureau because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 has reached a somber milestone: As of Wednesday afternoon, the highly infectious viral disease has taken more than 100,000 lives nationwide.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

One hundred thousand - that is how many people are now known to have been killed in the U.S. by a virus few had ever heard of just a few months ago. With less than 5% of the world's population, the U.S. accounts for nearly one-third of all known coronavirus fatalities. NPR's David Welna looks at this grim milestone and at where the American death toll may be headed.

DAVID WELNA, BYLINE: It took barely four months for the number of lives lost in the U.S. to the COVID-19 pandemic to reach the 100,000 mark.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

One hundred thousand - that is how many people are now known to have been killed in the U.S. by a virus few had ever heard of just a few months ago. With less than 5% of the world's population, the U.S. accounts for nearly one-third of all known coronavirus fatalities. NPR's David Welna looks at this grim milestone and at where the American death toll may be headed.

DAVID WELNA, BYLINE: It took barely four months for the number of lives lost in the U.S. to the COVID-19 pandemic to reach the 100,000 mark.

Long after the last loaf of sourdough bread is baked and the last quarantini is downed, there will be an archive of memories of life under quarantine in the form of online zines documenting the experiences of everyday people.

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