Calories, Carbs, Fat, Fiber: Unraveling The Links Between Breast Cancer And Diet

"A Low-Fat Diet Helps Reduce The Risk of Death From Breast Cancer." Did a headline like this catch your eye this week? Dozens of news organizations, including NPR, reported on a new study that found that a low-fat diet helped women reduce their risk of dying from breast cancer. The findings stem from the federally funded Women's Health Initiative , a huge, long-term, national health study launched back in 1993. At the time the study began, women who enrolled were in their 50s, 60s and 70s. As...

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's been nearly half a century since Neil Armstrong took that giant leap for mankind and walked on the moon. That was July, 1969. And as with every major production, there was a dress rehearsal. Fifty years ago today, Apollo 10 set forth toward the moon with a directive from NASA - don't land. To tell us more about that mission, we called Lieutenant General Thomas P. Stafford, the commander of Apollo 10's three-man crew. General Stafford, welcome. It is indeed an honor to speak with you.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's been nearly half a century since Neil Armstrong took that giant leap for mankind and walked on the moon. That was July, 1969. And as with every major production, there was a dress rehearsal. Fifty years ago today, Apollo 10 set forth toward the moon with a directive from NASA - don't land. To tell us more about that mission, we called Lieutenant General Thomas P. Stafford, the commander of Apollo 10's three-man crew. General Stafford, welcome. It is indeed an honor to speak with you.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

It's been nearly half a century since Neil Armstrong took that giant leap for mankind and walked on the moon. That was July, 1969. And as with every major production, there was a dress rehearsal. Fifty years ago today, Apollo 10 set forth toward the moon with a directive from NASA - don't land. To tell us more about that mission, we called Lieutenant General Thomas P. Stafford, the commander of Apollo 10's three-man crew. General Stafford, welcome. It is indeed an honor to speak with you.

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison won re-election on Saturday, stunning pollsters who had anticipated his defeat for several months. Morrison championed working-class economic stability during his campaign, and his victory is part of a populist trend, which now stretches across the U.S., Brazil, Hungary and Italy.

At his victory party in Sydney, Morrison said, "Tonight is about every single Australian who depends on their government to put them first. And that is exactly what we are going to do."

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

Austria's vice chancellor has resigned after German media published a video that purportedly showed him offering government contracts to a woman posing as the niece of a Russian oligarch, in exchange for media coverage and political funding.

The scandal drove Chancellor Sebastian Kurz to call for snap elections instead of trying to revive his weakened coalition government. "Enough is enough," he told reporters on Saturday in Vienna.

A couple of federal agencies you probably haven't heard of keep track of what farmers grow, what Americans eat and how the country's entire food system operates. And the Trump administration wants them out of Washington, D.C.

Last summer, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced the Economic Research Service (ERS) and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) would relocate somewhere that's closer to farmers and public universities doing agricultural research. But critics, including many scientists, balked, saying the agencies won't be as effective.

Sean Jin is 31 and says he'd not washed a dish until he was in his sophomore year of college.

"Literally my mom and my grandma would ... tell me to stop doing dishes because I'm a man and I shouldn't be doing dishes." It was a long time, he says, before he realized their advice and that sensibility were "not OK."

Zakary Pashak is a rare breed. His company, Detroit Bikes, is one of the very few American bicycle makers. Most bikes come from China.

At times, Pashak endured ridicule at trade shows. "I'd get kind of surly bike mechanics coming up and telling me that my products stunk. There's definitely a fair bit of attitude in my industry," he says.

But last September, the industry's tune abruptly changed. The first round of U.S. tariffs, or import taxes, upped the cost of Chinese-made bikes by 10%, and companies saw Detroit Bikes as a potential partner.

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Act Locally Waco - Events May 17 - 23

This week on Act Locally Waco , host Ashley Thornton talks about the events for budding entrepreneurs in Waco and other community involvement happenings. Learning Opportunities For Entrepreneurs: The Work of Artists – Step 1: Build a Base Creative Waco is offering a three-part series on helping you build your creative career.

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