Bill Chappell

It was only a matter of a few minutes — but the rules are the rules, and organizers say Malaysian shot putter Muhammad Ziyad Zolkefli became ineligible to compete after he arrived late to his event at the Tokyo Paralympics.

Zolkefli was allowed to compete in the event under protest on Tuesday, as Malaysia's delegation sought a way for him to defend the gold medal he won in Rio De Janeiro in 2016. He turned in the longest throw of the competition — in fact, his throw of 17.94 meters (58.85 feet) would have been good enough to win a gold medal and set a new world record.

If the U.S. had done more to reduce its incarceration rate, it could have prevented millions of COVID-19 cases.

That's the conclusion of researchers who conducted what they say is the first study to link mass incarceration rates to pandemic vulnerability. Many of those preventable cases, they add, occurred in communities of color.

A man who disrupted NBC News correspondent Shaquille Brewster's live report on Hurricane Ida is now facing an arrest warrant on criminal charges.

Members of the public helped identify Benjamin Eugene Dagley of Wooster, Ohio, according to police in Gulfport, Mississippi.

Dagley is charged with four criminal counts, including two counts of simple assault, one of disturbing the peace and another of violating an emergency curfew, according to the Gulfport Police Department.

The entire board of Iceland's soccer federation has abruptly resigned after being accused of mishandling allegations of sexual assault committed by players on the national team — and of covering up at least one alleged incident. The board also issued an apology to the victims, saying it believes them and promising to do better.

They helped their country fight for freedom, although they were denied it at home and served in a segregated Army unit. But the Black men of the 369th Infantry Regiment, widely known as the Harlem Hellfighters, fought with valor and skill — and their accomplishment has now been recognized with a Congressional Gold Medal.

The U.S. Forest Service is closing every national forest in California, citing the extraordinary risk of wildfires and forecasts that show the threat will only remain high or even get worse. The closures start Tuesday night and run through Sept. 17.

More than 6,800 wildfires have already burned 1.7 million acres of national forest land across California, the Forest Service said, posing a dire threat to people, wildlife and property.

Workers in China have earned a victory over employers' onerous work schedules, as the Supreme People's Court says a common schedule that requires people to work 12 hours a day for six days a week is illegal.

In recent years, several worker deaths have been linked to such schedules, which are common in the tech industry and in other sectors, such as logistics.

Updated August 20, 2021 at 2:53 PM ET

The National Hurricane Center has issued a rare hurricane watch for parts of New England, warning that Tropical Storm Henri will likely develop into a hurricane before making landfall on the northeastern U.S. coast this weekend.

"If Henri strikes southeast New England as a hurricane this weekend, it will be the first direct hurricane landfall since Bob in 1991," National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration spokesman Chris Vaccaro told NPR.

Updated August 20, 2021 at 12:09 PM ET

Mike Richards has announced he won't be hosting Jeopardy!, days after reports detailed sexist and other inappropriate comments he made in his former role as a podcast host.

"I will be stepping down as host effective immediately," Richards said in an email to staff that was provided to NPR on Friday.

Rome's Colosseum, the London Eye, the Empire State Building and Tokyo's Skytree tower are among more than 125 landmarks around the world that are being bathed in purple light Thursday night, recognizing the world's 1.2 billion people with disabilities.

The event, a call for inclusion and equal treatment, comes as the Paralympics are set to begin in Tokyo next week.

Aid agencies' effort to bring relief to Haitians hit by a strong earthquake is being complicated not just by the damage it wrought, but by flooding and washed-out roads from Tropical Storm Grace.

"People have been asking for tarps a lot, blankets, construction materials to rebuild their home" after the quake, Christy Delafield, managing director of communications for Mercy Corps, told NPR from Haiti Wednesday.

To get an idea of why scientists would want to study daddy longlegs, try playing a game of "One of these things is not like the others" the next time you see one.

"If you watch a daddy longlegs move, it will effectively walk on just three pairs of its legs," said Guilherme Gainett, a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. The remaining pair of legs, he adds, wave around in the air, probing the arachnid's surroundings.

When the Las Vegas Raiders kick off their NFL season next month, the team wants its home stadium to look as normal as possible, with stands full of fans. There's just one catch: To get in, every spectator will have to show proof they've gotten a COVID-19 vaccine. Anyone who hasn't can still enter — after they get a shot at Allegiant Stadium.

The Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan and removal of the U.S.-backed government was stunning in its speed and tragic in its impact, but it does not surprise experts who have monitored the U.S. reconstruction efforts for the past 20 years. The reasons why are summed up by eight paradoxes that are at the heart of a U.S.

Afghanistan's state of upheaval has forced its Paralympic team to cancel plans to compete in the Tokyo Paralympics, after commercial flights out of the country were halted in the wake of the Taliban seizing control.

"Due to the serious ongoing situation in the country, all airports are closed and there is no way for them to travel to Tokyo," the International Paralympic Committee's press office told NPR. "We hope the team and officials remain safe and well during this difficult time."

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