Eyder Peralta

Eyder Peralta is NPR's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi, Kenya.

He is responsible for covering the region's people, politics, and culture. In a region that vast, that means Peralta has hung out with nomadic herders in northern Kenya, witnessed a historic transfer of power in Angola, ended up in a South Sudanese prison, and covered the twists and turns of Kenya's 2017 presidential elections.

Previously, he covered breaking news for NPR, where he covered everything from natural disasters to the national debates on policing and immigration.

Peralta joined NPR in 2008 as an associate producer. Previously, he worked as a features reporter for the Houston Chronicle and a pop music critic for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville, FL.

Through his journalism career, he has reported from more than a dozen countries and he was part of the NPR teams awarded the George Foster Peabody in 2009 and 2014. His 2016 investigative feature on the death of Philando Castile was honored by the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society for News Design.

Peralta was born amid a civil war in Matagalpa, Nicaragua. His parents fled when he was a kid, and the family settled in Miami. He's a graduate of Florida International University.

Months after a Supreme Court decision shattered its business model, the streaming service Aereo has filed for bankruptcy.

"The U.S. Supreme Court decision effectively changed the laws that had governed Aereo's technology, creating regulatory and legal uncertainty," the company's founder and CEO Chet Kanojia said in a statement. "And while our team has focused its energies on exploring every path forward available to us, without that clarity, the challenges have proven too difficult to overcome."

The United States has transferred five detainees being held at its prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Georgia and Slovakia.

As The Wall Street Journal reports, four of the men are Yemeni, and that is important because they are the first Yemeni prisoners to be transferred since 2010. The newspaper explains:

After six years of often bitter back-and-forth with congressional Republicans over the issue of immigration, President Obama announced he has decided to go it alone by temporarily shielding up to 5 million immigrants from being deported.

We're a few days late on this, but it's too cool not to share.

Here's a NASA video made from a new model that shows how carbon dioxide moves throughout Earth:

NASA explains what you just watched:

Amid rumblings about conflict of interest and corruption, Mexico's first lady says she will sell a multimillion-dollar home in one of the most glamorous areas of Mexico City.

In a YouTube video released late Tuesday, Angélica Rivera defiantly proclaims that she has "nothing to hide."

"I have worked all my life, and because of that I am an independent woman capable of building a patrimony with honesty," she said.

A day after an attack that left five dead at a Jerusalem synagogue, worshippers returned for morning prayers.

The Associated Press reports:

Updated 1:30 a.m. ET Thursday:

Another 2 to 3 feet of snow is expected to fall in the Buffalo area by late Thursday. At least seven deaths in western New York have been blamed on the storm — at least four of them from heart attacks.

Original Post:

Driven by the lake effect, a massive snowstorm dumped up to 60 inches of snow on some parts of western New York, killing at least five people and paralyzing an area used to huge snow totals.

You probably noticed: It's really cold outside. But it's not just you.

According to the National Weather Service and meteorologist Eric Holthaus, all 50 states hit 32 degrees or lower on Tuesday.

Yep. Even Hawaii, where Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano reaching 13,800 feet above sea level, was below freezing.

This map from the National Weather Service's Twin Cities office shows you that:

The National Football League has suspended Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson for the remainder of the 2014 season.

Commissioner Roger Goodell informed Peterson of his suspension in a letter made public on Tuesday.

Just after his country's economy officially fell back into recession, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced he would dissolve parliament and call for elections two years ahead of schedule.

The BBC reports:

"Mr Abe was elected two years ago with an ambitious plan to revive the economy, but has struggled to do so.

"His popularity has fallen but he is expected to win the election, which will take place in mid-December.

President Obama has ordered a full review of the process the United States uses to try to recover Americans taken hostage overseas.

In a recent letter to a lawmaker, Christine Wormuth, under secretary of defense for policy, said Obama ordered the review as a "result of the increased frequency of hostage-taking of Americans overseas, and the recognition of the dynamic threat posed by specific terrorist groups."

(This post was last updated at 5:15 p.m. ET.)

Two assailants, armed with a gun, knives and axes, launched an attack on worshippers at a Jerusalem Synagogue on Tuesday. It left five dead and at least six others wounded.

The U.S. State Department said three of the four killed were dual American and Israeli citizens. A policeman injured in the attack died late Tuesday, Haaretz reported.

The Colombian government has called off talks with Marxist rebels over the capture of a Colombian Army general.

Reporting for our Newscast unit, John Otis says the talks were designed to bring an end to 50 years of fighting between the Colombian government and Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

John sent this report:

"General Ruben Dario Alzate was detained by FARC rebels while traveling by riverboat in a remote jungle region. It marks the first time that the guerrillas have taken an army general captive.

Agents from the Drug Enforcement Agency conducted surprise inspections of the staff of at least three National Football League teams on Sunday.

CNN reports:

"The DEA questioned the medical and training staffs of the San Francisco 49ers following the team's 16-10 victory at the New York Giants, agency spokesman Rusty Payne told CNN.

Dr. Martin Salia, an Ebola patient who was flown to a Nebraska hospital for treatment, has died, hospital spokeswoman Jenny Nowatzke says.

Salia was working as a general surgeon at a hospital in Sierra Leone. Last Monday, despite the fact that he was not working with Ebola patients, he was diagnosed with the virus.

Pages