Glenn Robinson

Host of Business of Health Care

Glenn Robinson has been the President of Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Hillcrest since September 2007. He previously held several CEO positions at hospitals in Texas, Oregon, and South Carolina. A Georgia native and graduate of the University of Alabama, Glenn completed graduate school at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. 

He has more than 30 years experience in hospital and healthcare management, is a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives, and has received several professional awards. Most notably, he was named to Tenet Healthcare’s CEO Circle of Excellence in two separate years, and is the recipient of an Achievement Award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  

Glenn also serves on a number of national and state healthcare policy boards, including the American Hospital Association Board of Trustees. In addition, he serves as Chair of AHA’s Regional Policy Board 7, a member of the Texas Hospital Association Board of Trustees, and has served as Chairman of the THA’s Council on Policy Development. He also serves as an Adjunct Lecturer for both Baylor University and Trinity University and is involved in several non-profit organizations and community councils including Prosper Waco, Pine Cove Christian Camps, Restoration Gateway, and the Greater Waco Chamber of Commerce. 

Glenn and his wife, Rhonda, enjoy spending time with their children: son Josh and his wife Lauren, son Jacob and his wife Melissa, and daughter Sarah Kathryn and her husband Jordan; and three grandsons: Pierce, Caden and Colt.

You've long been able to get food, drinks, money and even DVDs out of machine kiosks. Now there is something else Waco residents can get from well designed machines - their prescription medications. 


There are a number of myths when it comes to medicine – what works, what doesn’t, what’s safe and what isn’t.

 

 


 

As of mid-May, more than 800 cases of measles have been reported across 23 states. It is the highest number of cases of the illness reported in a quarter century. 

Last August, electric scooters – already common in metro areas throughout Texas – appeared unannounced on Waco sidewalks.

 

 


 

Hospital emergency departments can go from near ghost towns to overcrowded in no time at all, which can create a recipe for long waits for some patients.

 

 


 

If you take a moment to delve into the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statics jobs report for March, you would see that the healthcare industry produced more jobs than any other sector of the economy, adding nearly 50,000 jobs in one month alone.

 


 

 

Privacy concerns over technology are not just limited to social media and smart phones.

 

 


 

Each day, more than 1,500 Americans file for bankruptcy due to medical bills. The United States spends far more on healthcare per person than any other developed nation. These are familiar talking points to those who have followed the healthcare debate over the past decade. 

Although its been at the top of the list of concerns of Americans for some time, the question remains, how do we bend the cost of healthcare down?


Community health workers have emerged as an effective strategy in engaging patients and caregivers in lowering costs for healthcare's "frequent flyers" – patients who often visit emergency rooms and fill hospital beds.


Few fields of medicine have advanced over the past 40 years as much as transplantation medicine, and we continue to see encouraging developments in this dynamic specialty both nationally and right here in our own backyard. 


Recently, longtime Jeopardy game show host Alex Trebek announced that he has late stage pancreatic cancer. It’s a difficult diagnosis that many other high-profile individuals have received – including Steve Jobs, Patrick Swayze, and current Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In fact, the American Cancer Society estimates that, in 2019, more than 55,000 Americans will be diagnosed with the disease, and 45,000 will die from it. 


For millennia, there has been a special relationship between people and animals. In healthcare, animals are being used in increasingly diverse roles to help patients as studies continue to explore more ways animals can contribute to our health. 

Move more, sit less and get kids active as young as age three, say new federal guidelines. The government's guidelines go on to stress that any amount and any type of exercise helps health. 

When communities turn to healthcare organizations, they expect to receive care that is scientifically sound. It's the kind of care the nation's leading healthcare organizations are committed to providing. But as our nation becomes more diverse, communities also expect care that is culturally competent. 

We tend to think of the flu as a nasty but temporary illness we'd like to avoid if possible - but the flu can be even more serious than many people realize. 

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