All Things Considered

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All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. NPR's world-wide news team provides the latest information on national and international events.    

Researchers say they have identified the first clearly effective treatments for Ebola, a deadly disease that continues to spread in central Africa. The experimental drugs will be made widely available in the centers that have already treated thousands of patients.

This achievement is particularly notable given the extraordinary circumstances: Scientists in the Democratic Republic of Congo have been running a study in the midst of a deadly epidemic and in the face of armed assaults on doctors.

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Troll Watch: Trending Hashtags

Aug 11, 2019

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Is The Food Renaissance About To End?

Aug 11, 2019

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Interview With 'Luce' Filmmaker

Aug 10, 2019

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TV producer Ali Rosen talks about what women in their 20s should be thinking about if they want to, quote-unquote, "have it all."

(SOUNDBITE OF BUSTA RHYMES AND THE CONGLOMERATE'S "PARTITION (REMIX)")

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Federal agents carried out one of the largest immigration raids in recent history this week, arresting nearly 700 workers at chicken processing plants in Mississippi.

But you can still buy a rotisserie bird at your local supermarket tonight for less than $10.

So far, the government crackdown has had little effect on the wider food processing industry, a dangerous business that is heavily reliant on immigrant labor.

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Federal immigration officials arrested nearly 700 workers at chicken processing plants in Mississippi. But you can still buy a rotisserie bird at your local supermarket tonight for less than $10. Administration officials say this kind of enforcement discourages illegal immigration, but critics say it just leaves undocumented workers even more vulnerable to exploitation. NPR's Scott Horsley joins us now.

Welcome to the studio, Scott.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Hi, Audie.

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As young men, the sons of the Villalobos family in rural Veracruz, Mexico embarked on separate paths — at least, geographically. One by one, the three violin-playing brothers left their hometown of Xalapa to study classical music abroad. Ernesto, the oldest of the three, went to study at the Manhattan School of Music. Alberto, the middle brother, went to the Royal Conservatory of Brussels and finally Luis, the youngest, went to the Hochschule für Musik in Freiburg, Germany.

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