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All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. NPR's world-wide news team provides the latest information on national and international events.    

After more than a year of high-stakes negotiations with billions of dollars on the line, a bankruptcy plan for Purdue Pharma, the maker of OxyContin, cleared a major hurdle late Wednesday.

Federal Judge Robert Drain in White Plains, N.Y., moved the controversial deal forward despite objections from dozens of state attorneys general, setting the stage for a final vote by the company's creditors expected this summer.

The drugmaker filed for Chapter 11 protection in 2019 facing an avalanche of lawsuits tied to its aggressive opioid sales practices.

President Biden and Senate Republicans have agreed to continue negotiations on an infrastructure spending plan despite an ongoing split over the scope of the proposal and how to pay for it.

Biden hosted Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va., the GOP's lead negotiator on infrastructure, at the White House on Wednesday, and the pair agreed to reconvene Friday as the window for a bipartisan deal appears to be narrowing.

The Biden administration aims to have an agreement this summer, and some fellow Democrats are urging the president to wrap up bipartisan talks.

NBA fans have been flooding back into arenas for the playoffs.

The presence of ticket-purchasing and merchandise-buying humans, missing for more than a year during the coronavirus pandemic, has been a welcome sight for the cash-strapped league. Players have loved feeding off the excitement of live audiences.

Tyrus Joseforsky had resigned himself to never seeing any federal aid set aside to help his business. "I just made peace with the fact that it wasn't coming," he said.

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No patent leather shoes on the dance floor. No teenagers struggling to put on cufflinks for the first time.

"Last year was pretty much non-existent in our business," says Pam Guedoura, owner of Tuxedos and Suits With Style, in Dover, New Hampshire.

Most proms and weddings were cancelled last year due to COVID-19, which was financially crushing to stores that rent tuxedos and formal wear. But as states lift restrictions and cases of the coronavirus decline, those shops are getting back in the business of making teenagers look good.

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There's a 6-foot-tall fence going up around the Tenacious Unicorn Ranch in rural Custer County, Colo. The people who live there say they need it because they've been the target of harassment since they relocated the trans-friendly ranch there in 2020.

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Updated June 7, 2021 at 5:00 PM ET

In the early months of India's coronavirus pandemic, Manisha Pande recalls watching the evening news tell the public to go outside and bang pots and pans in solidarity with healthcare workers. She says that the energy was very "we're going to fight this thing together," encouraged by Prime Minister Narenda Modi.

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