archaeology

I’m Jim McKeown, welcome to Likely Stories, a weekly review of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

When I was in about seventh grade, I came upon a book which aroused my interest in Egyptology.  The book was Gods, Graves, and Scholars.  I read at least the Egyptian part of that book numerous times a year.  I have many shelves stuffed with my collection of books on ancient Egypt.  Then, my wife suggested I might like to read a novel by Jodi Picoult, The Book of Two Ways.  My interest in Egypt exploded anew.

 

I’m Jim McKeown, welcome to Likely Stories, a weekly review of fiction, Non-Fiction, and Poetry.

In my distant past, I had an affair with archaeology.  I read of all the tombs and digs.  Recently, I came across The Golden Child by Penelope Fitzgerald.  According to the paperback cover, she is one of England’s most celebrated contemporary writers with scads of short novels.  She died in 2000.

The story begins when an ancient, gold-covered corpse of the African ruler of the Garamantia arrives at a London Museum. It “instantly becomes the sinister focus of a web of intrigue spun by all manner of museum personal” (Jacket).  Three characters are prominent: the archaeologist, a scruffy guard, and a junior office in the museum.  This is satire of the first order.


Amusing tale of the discovery of one of the largest buried ships from the Anglo-Saxon period.