Art and Culture

Art and culture

Sofie Hernandez-Simeonidis

There are important differences between experiencing something online and experiencing it in person.  But there’s still something good that can come from virtual art.

Is there anyway online content can be made as effective as in-person content? Can it be anywhere close? I know school districts are wrestling with this question right now. It’s at the forefront of their concerns as the uncertainties of the coming school year loom just ahead. I also know very few teachers who think that online content comes anywhere close to the experience of in-person education. 

The Sensational Whirlwinds with Johnny Twiller were one of the many great groups featured on Rochester, New York's Lifetime label. 

Hear the full track below!


On this week's episode of Coversations With Creative Waco, Fiona Bond sits down with Rev. Amos Humphries, Senior Pastor of Park Lake Drive Baptist Church, and artist and business owner Tashita Bibles. They discuss the tragedy that brought them together, and the way that they are using art to pave the way forward. 


I’m Jim McKeown, welcome to Likely Stories, a weekly review of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

I have always been fascinated by nature--especially animals.  When I came across Tarka the Otter by Henry Williamson, I could not resist.  I had never heard of Williamson, but the intro had a vast selection of stories by him.  The New York Review Books also provided a brief biography.  “Henry Williamson was born in Brockley, London.  In January of 1914, he enlisted in the British Army, and by November he was fighting in the trenches on the Western front.  He worked his way up to Lieutenant by 1916, and he fell sick from a gas attack in 1917.  Later he wrote for a local paper.  He died in 1977. 


Sofie Hernandez-Simeonidis

With their doors shut, concert halls and art museums leave a big hole in the cultural landscape.  Here is David Smith with this weeks edition of David and Art.

The reports from the art world are not very rosy.  As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, arts institutions, like so many other places, are feeling the strains.  Some art museums have cautiously opened back up, but some other, major ones are waiting.  The National Gallery of Art in Washington DC for instance is still closed, although it recently opened its outdoor sculpture garden on a limited basis.  The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York has announced that it’s not planning to open its doors until August 29.

Largely because of these ongoing closures, arts institutions—which, even in the best of times aren’t exactly flush with cash—are feeling it in the bottom line.  With their doors closed until who knows

"Rocka My Soul" from the A'Cappels captures both the passion of the old spirituals and the joyful precision of jubilee. 

Hear the full track below!


I’m Jim McKeown, welcome to Likely Stories, a weekly review of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

A large part of my graduate education revolved around the trinity of 19th century authors: George Eliot, the Brontë sisters, and Jane Austen.  Susan Carson edited 33 Great Writers on Why We Read Jane Austen.  This remarkable book drives the reader into Austen’s entire world from all angles.  Every devotee of Austen should own a copy of this work.  I hope I can find a similar book for Eliot and the Brontës.


David and Art - "See His Face"

Jul 13, 2020
Sofie Hernandez-Simeonidis

Street art can be some of the best commemoration for things we need to remember. 

By the Thursday after George Floyd’s death on a Monday, a group of artists were painting a mural on the wall of the Cup Foods store very near where he died.  You’ve probably seen it in news coverage from Minneapolis.  It’s a predominantly yellow and blue mural with an image of Floyd’s face in the center, flanked left and right by his name.  In the yellow letters of his name are individuals rendered in light blue minimalisticaly with fists raised in solidarity.  The background is an enormous sunflower, in the heart of which are names of people who have suffered a fate similar to that of Floyd.  The choice 

The obscure Spiritualistics of Kankakee, Illinois prove that great gospel music can come from just about anywhere at any time!

Hear the full track below!


I’m Jim McKeown, welcome to Likely Stories, a weekly review of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

Julia Alvarez is an amazing writer.  Julia has an impressive collection of literary rewards.  In 2013, President Obama awarded her the National Medal of Arts in recognition of her extraordinary storytelling. 

 


David and Art - "Alabama"

Jul 6, 2020
Sofie Hernandez-Simeonidis

How one of America's jazz greats took on one of the greatests outrages in the American Civil Rights Movement. 

On a bright Sunday morning in Birmingham, Alabama, a bomb exploded under the rear steps of the 16th Street Baptist Church.  Four young girls who were in the basement changing into their choir robes for the youth service that morning, were killed.  Another 20 people or so were wounded.  The explosion left a crater five feet wide and two feet deep in the basement.  The bomb was placed there by four members of the Ku Klux Klan.  It was September 15, 1963. 

Two months later saxophonist John Coltrane stepped into a studio to record a song that he had written in tribune to the girls who were killed.  It was called simply “Alabama.”  A few

The Kings of Harmony were among the most influential jubilee groups to record in the early days of gospel music. 

Hear the full track below!


I’m Jim McKeown, welcome to Likely Stories, a weekly review of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry.

According to the dust jacket, Crissy Van Meter grew up in Southern California.  She holds an MFA in creative writing from the New School.  Creatures is her first novel.  

 


Conversations With Creative Waco - Todd Bertka

Jun 29, 2020

On this week's episode of Conversations With Creative Waco, host Kennedy Sam sits down with Todd Bertka, director of the Waco Convention Center and Visitor's Bureau. She also talks with Fiona Bond about Creative Waco's role in the current socio-political landscape. 


David and Art - "Remembering Christo"

Jun 29, 2020
Sofie Hernandez-Simeonidis

Looking back at the career of an artist whose projects transformed landscapes for a few days.

A visionary and world-famous artist died at the end of May.  Christo Javacheff was born in Bulgaria in 1935 and from his youth studied art.  In 1956 he escaped from Bulgaria and made his way to Vienna, Geneva, and finally to Paris.  He and his wife, who was his regular collaborator, moved to New York in 1964 and he became an American citizen in 1973.

Christo began his career as a painter but under the influence of revolutionary artists like

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