Politics

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Texas’ so-called Rainy Day Fund is an emergency pool of money that comes from oil and gas taxes. The account has ballooned with Texas’ most recent oil and gas boom and has been turned to recently to shore up statewide water and road projects. State lawmakers established a minimum balance for the fund to make sure Texas always has some extra cash on hand.


"The report is full of crap."

That's what former Vice President Dick Cheney told Fox News in an interview about a Senate investigation that found the Central Intelligence Agency used brutal techniques to interrogate terrorism suspects and then misled lawmakers, the White House and Congress about what they were doing.

As momentum grows behind a push to let Texans carry handguns openly, the biggest fight may be among Second Amendment advocates themselves.

Following a punishing loss to Republican State Sen. Dan Patrick in the race for Lieutenant Governor, Leticia Van de Putte appears ready to run again - but not for her seat in the Senate.

The third generation San Antonian is ending speculation about her future by announcing her plans to campaign for the seat recently held by Housing and Urban Development secretary Julian Castro: Mayor of San Antonio. Van de Putte says that the support she received from her hometown was what influenced her to run.

The judge in the abuse of power case against Governor Rick Perry is overruling objections from Perry's legal team over the way the special prosecutor was sworn in. 

Perry's attorneys argued that special prosecutor Michael McCrum had not taken the oath of office and filed a required document in the proper way. The defense said because the oath wasn't done properly, McCrum was not authorized to act as prosecutor and everything he had done to this point -- including overseeing grand jury proceedings that produced the indictments against Perry -- were invalid.

Ted Cruz Criticizes 'Net Neutrality' In Austin

Nov 14, 2014
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On Friday U.S. Senator Ted Cruz of Texas visited the Capital Factory, a startup business incubator in Austin, to make a speech opposing net neutrality, calling it “Obamacare for the Internet.” Last week President Obama called for more regulation of Internet service providers to prevent them from providing preferential access to some companies. Cruz argued that regulating the Internet will still end up favoring large companies with armies of lobbyists.

Governor-elect Greg Abbott says he has a plan to unite Texas, and it includes whom he appoints to key state offices.

In fact, Abbott began reaching out to minority groups as part of his landslide election victory. He says he’ll continue those efforts to communicate with minorities as governor.

He says he recently attended a Texas Legislative Black Caucus meeting, and he’s picked a Hispanic to be the next secretary of state, pending senate confirmation -- Judge Carlos Cascos of the Rio Grande Valley.

Only twice in American history has a son followed his father into the presidency. The first was John Quincy Adams. The second, George W. Bush, has now written a biography of his father, George H.W. Bush. It's called 41: A Portrait of My Father.

The 43rd president of the United States traces the life of the 41st from his youth in New England through his entry into the Texas oil business, combat during World War II, party politics, diplomacy, the White House, retirement — and skydiving.

Texas senators Cornyn and Cruz plan on taking apart President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, piece by piece, following the Republican Senate takeover. 

It should come as no surprise that the Texas Republican who filibustered an Obamacare funding bill for over 20 hours, is the one vowing to put an end to the president’s signature legislation and kill other legislative efforts by Democrats in the U.S. senate.

In a post-election press conference, the newly elected Republican Governor, Greg Abbott, said it was time to put the election behind and begin the process of getting back to work, that work ranged from border issues, Ebola preparedness and the effectiveness of Gov. Perry’s Texas Enterprise Fund.

For much of this election year there was powerful conventional wisdom about the race for governor in Texas: Democrat Wendy Davis couldn’t win, Republicans couldn’t lose and Texas wouldn’t change.

Now that Election Day has come and gone, it’s clear that that conventional wisdom got a good bit right. But in the eyes of author and commentator Richard Parker, [it] got a good bit wrong as well. 

Republicans swept the statewide elections last night. Already, controversial national issues are on the table for the next session, including immigration, border security, education and health. However, this is good time to be a Republican in Texas. And pundits expect at least two people with Texas connections could be preparing themselves for a presidential run. Guessing any names, anyone? 

Ryland Barton, KWBU News

Democratic lieutenant governor candidate Leticia Van De Putte stopped in Waco as part of her final campaign push before next week’s election. Van De Putte is way behind in the polls, but hoping for a surprise surge of voters. She’s been working to show the differences between her and her opponent, Republican State Senator Dan Patrick.


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Election day is next Tuesday and several Texas statewide offices are on the ballot. With Democrats trailing in the polls, there don't appear to be any hotly contested races.


From The Texas Tribune:

Republican Greg Abbott has a 16-point lead over Democrat Wendy Davis in the closing days of this year’s general election for governor, according to the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll.

Abbott has the support of 54 percent of likely voters to Davis’ 38 percent. Libertarian Kathie Glass has the support of 6 percent, and the Green Party’s Brandon Parmer got 2 percent.

“The drama of the outcome is not who wins, but what the margin will be,” said Jim Henson, co-director of the poll and head of the Texas Politics Project at the University of Texas at Austin. “Wendy Davis has not led in a single poll in this race.”

Among men, Abbott holds a 61-32 lead in this survey. And he leads by 2 percentage points — 48 to 46 — among women.

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