texas standard

U.S. Customs and Border Protection /Wikimedia Commons (Public domain)
Bill Zeeble/KERA

Before they compete, some Cliburn participants play for school kids.


House Passes Compromise 'Bathroom Bill'

May 22, 2017
Gabriel Cristóver Pérez/KUT News.

From Texas Standard: 

President Donald Trump's proposed border wall expansion could mean many more legal cases regarding how landowners should be compensated for the government condemning their property to house parts of the barrier.

In this episode of the Central Texas Leadership Series is David Brown, host of the Texas Standard. Hosting the conversation is Maxey Parrish, a professor of journalism at Baylor University.  


From Texas Standard:

My favorite snack as a teenager was a Dr Pepper with salty peanuts. You remember: you pour the peanuts into the Dr Pepper and let them float around and season the drink. Didn’t get much better than that.

Dr Pepper is the oldest soft drink in America. Older than Coca-Cola, in fact, by a full year. It was created in 1885 by a pharmacist, Charles Alderton, in Waco, Texas. And its original name was Waco – it was served there at the soda fountain in the drugstore. The drink was an instant hit; customers would sit down on one of those old spinning stools and say, “Shoot me a Waco.”

 


From Texas Standard:

In a time before reality TV competitions like American Ninja Warrior, more than 30,000 Texans would show up on Sundays in October to watch prisoners put on a death-defying rodeo show that would make professional cowboys think twice.

Underlying the spectacle of the Texas Prison Rodeo, which during its 50 years evolved into an entertainment event complete with superstar guests like John Wayne and Johnny Cash, were many of the civil, political and criminal justice issues that propel our conversations today – explored in depth in the new book, "Convict Cowboys: The Untold Story of the Texas Prison Rodeo."

 


Are viral law ads a new internet reality?

Jul 15, 2016
Screenshot via YouTube/Hutson & Harris, Attorneys

From Texas Standard.

After a duet from two lawyers in Waco called “Don’t Eat Your Weed” made the rounds on the internet, some say we could see more legal advice through viral videos. 


woodleywonderworks/Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

A new study looked at free summer meal programs across the state and the limited access that low-income kids have to free meal sites.


From Texas Standard:

Gov. Greg Abbott is on his third official international trip since being sworn in last January. Yesterday in Jerusalem, the Governor met with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Last week Abbott said the purpose of the upcoming meeting was to promote business ties abroad.

However, since news broke over the weekend of the U.S. prisoner swap and an end to sanctions against Iran, Monday's meeting seemed more like a political trip. That’s left some scratching their heads, and others nodding in approval.

 


Texas Standard and NPR's Here& Now - Weekdays on KWBU

Jul 13, 2015

August has arrived and that means mid-day news returns to KWBU.  

We're proud to announce the addition of new two new programs to our weekday schedule. It's no longer enough to offer news only in the morning and afternoons. It’s essential to have access throughout the day to news you can trust. Waco and the Heart of Texas deserves to hear the best of what public radio has to offer.

Photo via Flickr/plong (CC BY 2.0)

For the first time in a long time, the night of the Fourth of July in Texas will be red, white, blue – and green. That's thanks to abundant rain so far this year. The lower risk for wildfires means more types of fireworks are available for sale across Texas. And as the Texas Standard's Laura Rice reports, fireworks vendors are seeing more people interested in lighting up the night sky for this year's fourth.


 

Photo via Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

In Texas... that old adage of avoiding mosquitoes at dusk and dawn no longer applies. That's because the state has mosquitoes that are also out and about in the middle of the day. And those are the type that carry a painful disease that's spread from South and Central America into Mexico and now, perhaps Texas. The Texas Standard's Laura Rice has more.

 

 


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