Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS

Scientists are ramping up research on the possible health effects of a large group of common but little-understood chemicals used in water-resistant clothing, stain-resistant furniture, nonstick cookware and many other consumer products. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances are generally referred to by their plural acronym, PFAS . PFAS are resistant to water, oil and heat, and their use has expanded rapidly since they were developed by companies in the mid-20th century. Today, PFAS' nonstick...

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Sunni extremists from the so-called Islamic State blew up the tomb of the Prophet Jonah in Mosul on Thursday. The site is holy to both Christians and Muslims.

NPR's Leila Fadel reports that video of the explosion quickly spread online, and residents of the city and across Iraq were angered by the destruction.

Tony La Russa's tenure as manager of the Chicago White Sox, Oakland A's and St. Louis Cardinals is legendary. La Russa, who on Sunday will be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, won a total of 2,728 games — more than any Major League Baseball manager in the past 60 years.

And when he hung up his jersey for good after the Cardinals made a historic late-season run in 2011, La Russa became the first manager to retire immediately after winning a world championship.

Behind the Story: Food Insecurity, Food Deserts

Jul 25, 2014
McLennan County Food Desert Project, Baylor University

This week we’re turning our attention towards poverty and hunger in Waco. First KWBU’s Jill Ament recently reported on a new program at Waco ISD called Meals on the Bus. The initiative strives to provide meals for students students on free or reduced lunches even during the summer. And their families too, turn to this program to get the meals they need. Now Waco ISD is initiating a new program to try and boost participation in the program. Jill sat down with Kelsey Miller from Baylor’s Texas Hunger Initiative.

Narcissistic tendencies impair ethical judgment in the workplace, even if a person is religious. (*ENCORE)


Jim McKeown

An interesting excursion into the mind of a reader, writer, and inveterate “book smeller.”

 


Wacoans Sound Off On Transportation Priorities

Jul 23, 2014
flickr.com/nofailsafe

With Congress moving a step closer passing a bill that funds transportation projects across the country, the Texas Department of Transportation was in Waco to get public comment on projects. McLennan County is expected to have about 50,000 more people living in the area in 25 years. But TxDOT says it doesn’t have enough money to keep up with population growth.


Chris Tomlinson spent most of his life comfortable that he knew who he was and where he came from. After all, a small part of Texas was named after his ancestors. Tomlinson Hill is a small town community in Falls County. It's a place where generations of his family carved out a comfortable living from the land.

Before the Civil War, they also owned slaves. But Chris grew up believing what he'd been told: that the slaves his family owned were happy – so happy they took the family name and settled the land after they were free.

It was not until after he returned from 11 years in Africa as the Nairobi Bureau Chief for the Associated Press that Tomlinson decided to delve into his family history. What he learned not only changed his sense of family, it changed his sense of history as well. The result of his search is the book, "Tomlinson Hill."

If Texas accepted federal funding to expand Medicaid, roughly 1.5 million more people would have health insurance. Now a new study suggests more than half of them are people who work in service industries that help fuel the state’s economy.

The report by Families USA says the people in Texas who’d benefit most from closing the coverage gap are cashiers, drivers, cooks and servers, hotel clerks and construction workers, for example.

Many of them don’t earn enough to qualify for a tax subsidy under the Affordable Care Act, Dee Mahon with Families USA says.

Report: New Law Led to Statewide Drop in Abortions

Jul 23, 2014

The number of abortions in Texas decreased by about 13 percent statewide and 21 percent in the Lower Rio Grande Valley following the passage of strict abortion regulations that went into effect last November, according to a report that academic researchers released Wednesday. 

Texas Education Commissioner Michael Williams wants an additional year to study a new state teacher evaluation system. The additional period would delay the official roll out for two years.

Commissioner Williams wrote a letter to federal education officials Wednesday, where he also requested the federal government extend a waiver from No Child Left Behind requirements.

In a statement, Williams said:

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