All Things Considered

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All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. NPR's world-wide news team provides the latest information on national and international events.    

When Gordon Sondland arrived at the Capitol last month to provide what would be pivotal testimony in the Trump impeachment inquiry, a reporter asked the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, "Are you here to salvage your reputation?"

"I don't have a reputation to salvage," Sondland shot back.

Until recently, Sondland, 62, had a pretty low profile outside his hometown of Portland, Ore., where he and his wife, Katy Durant, are big Republican donors and contributors to numerous arts and civic organizations.

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Southeast Asia's largest lake is under threat, and with it, an entire ecosystem. Dams, overfishing and this year, drought, have brought the Cambodian lake to what may be a breaking point. Michael Sullivan reports.

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ADAM SCHIFF: This committee will come to order.

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As public impeachment hearings continue, let's look ahead to tomorrow's witness. It's the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, Gordon Sondland. President Trump gave Sondland an unusual role in Ukraine policy. As part of it, Sondland urged Ukrainian officials to launch investigations so that military aid could flow. Like Trump himself, Sondland is a real estate developer who gravitated towards politics. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, he wasn't always a fan of the president.

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Susannah Cahalan had all the symptoms of a severe mental illness.

SUSANNAH CAHALAN: I was hallucinating. I was paranoid. I was actively psychotic.

SHAPIRO: What she didn't have was a mental illness. Cahalan actually had an autoimmune disease that caused inflammation of the brain. She wrote about the experience of being misdiagnosed and her eventual recovery in her 2012 memoir.

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Susannah Cahalan had all the symptoms of a severe mental illness.

SUSANNAH CAHALAN: I was hallucinating. I was paranoid. I was actively psychotic.

SHAPIRO: What she didn't have was a mental illness. Cahalan actually had an autoimmune disease that caused inflammation of the brain. She wrote about the experience of being misdiagnosed and her eventual recovery in her 2012 memoir.

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Susannah Cahalan had all the symptoms of a severe mental illness.

SUSANNAH CAHALAN: I was hallucinating. I was paranoid. I was actively psychotic.

SHAPIRO: What she didn't have was a mental illness. Cahalan actually had an autoimmune disease that caused inflammation of the brain. She wrote about the experience of being misdiagnosed and her eventual recovery in her 2012 memoir.

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We're going way up north for our next story to a ship in the middle of the Arctic Ocean. The scientists aboard are there to do fieldwork, which is easier said than done, as Ravenna Koenig reports.

The State Of Spanish-Language Media In U.S.

Nov 17, 2019

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This week, Tribune Publishing announced it would be closing its Chicago-based Spanish-language weekly newspaper, Hoy. The paper was launched in 2003 to serve the city's Spanish-speaking and bilingual communities.

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First, we're going to talk about an event on the campus of Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., that's caused an uproar. Not so much about what happened during the event but about how student news organizations decided to cover it.

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