All Things Considered

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All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. NPR's world-wide news team provides the latest information on national and international events.    

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In two weeks, most people traveling to the U.S. from overseas will have to provide proof of vaccination. It's all part of the reopening of international travel that had been shut down for more than a year. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith has new details.

The problem with apple-picking

Oct 24, 2021

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Finally today, we're going to talk about apple picking. Lots of people do it each fall, and they enjoy it. Or so it seems when you ask them about it. We picked some apple pickers at an orchard in Red Hook, N.Y., to tell us about their experience.

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The U.S. government wants to know why some U.S. diplomats and intelligence officers are getting sick. It's called Havana syndrome, after the illnesses turned up in Havana. Many say they've suffered debilitating migraines, dizziness and memory loss.

Some history may be relevant. Years before the first Havana cases were reported, the U.S. government documented microwave radiation being directed at a U.S. embassy and at officials abroad. NPR national security correspondent Greg Myre has the backstory.

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And finally today, in the near future, residents of Seattle may well be startled as they notice a fleet of new cars cruising down the city streets. These are to be cars without drivers behind the wheel.

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And finally today, in the near future, residents of Seattle may well be startled as they notice a fleet of new cars cruising down the city streets. These are to be cars without drivers behind the wheel.

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UNIDENTIFIED NEWS ANCHOR: (Laughter) It looks like a - maybe like a bus from the front and a toaster on the side.

Oh no. Not again.

Just when COVID surge in the U.S. has begun to decline, another coronavirus variant has immediately cropped up. This time in the U.K.

Known in the media as "delta-plus," this mutant is raising some concern because over the past few weeks, it's begun to spread in several parts of Britain. It now accounts for about 6% of all cases in the U.K.

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