All Things Considered

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  • Hosted by Robert Siegel, Kelly Mc Evers, Ari Shapiro

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. NPR's world-wide news team provides the latest information on national and international events.    

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Late this afternoon, congressional leaders from both parties met with President Trump at the White House and were given a classified briefing about the downing of the U.S. drone. Congressman Adam Smith is a Democrat from Washington state who chairs the House Armed Services Committee, and he was at that meeting. Thank you for joining us.

ADAM SMITH: Thank you for having me, appreciate the chance.

SHAPIRO: I realize there was classified information at this briefing, but what can you tell us about what you learned this afternoon?

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Late this afternoon, congressional leaders from both parties met with President Trump at the White House and were given a classified briefing about the downing of the U.S. drone. Congressman Adam Smith is a Democrat from Washington state who chairs the House Armed Services Committee, and he was at that meeting. Thank you for joining us.

ADAM SMITH: Thank you for having me, appreciate the chance.

SHAPIRO: I realize there was classified information at this briefing, but what can you tell us about what you learned this afternoon?

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Late this afternoon, congressional leaders from both parties met with President Trump at the White House and were given a classified briefing about the downing of the U.S. drone. Congressman Adam Smith is a Democrat from Washington state who chairs the House Armed Services Committee, and he was at that meeting. Thank you for joining us.

ADAM SMITH: Thank you for having me, appreciate the chance.

SHAPIRO: I realize there was classified information at this briefing, but what can you tell us about what you learned this afternoon?

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

All right. Let's put that same question - how will the U.S. respond? - to two of the many NPR reporters working this story today. Our diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen is with us. Hey, Michele.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Hi there, Mary Louise.

KELLY: Hey. Along with NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman. Hi, Tom.

TOM BOWMAN, BYLINE: Hello.

KELLY: Tom, you start. And before we get to the what next, let's do the what just happened. What is the Pentagon's account of this shootdown?

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Carla Johnson has been evicted from nine apartments in the past four years. All she did, she says, was complain about things like a gas leak, mold or a missing security gate.

"It's cheaper for the landlord to put you out and move someone else in that doesn't know about the problem," she says.

She lives in Newburgh, N.Y., a former industrial town on the Hudson River about two hours north of Manhattan. She says most apartment owners in Newburgh do the bare minimum to maintain a unit, and if tenants complain, they get evicted.

The recent discovery of the remains of the last slave ship to the United States is bringing hope of revival to Africatown. It's a small community in Mobile, Ala., founded by African captives brought on the schooner Clotilda, thought to have arrived sometime in 1859 or 1860.

Lorna Woods' great-great-grandfather, Charlie Lewis, was brought to Mobile on the Clotilda. Now she tells his story as a volunteer with the local history museum.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The U.S. women's soccer team is back in action tomorrow at the Women's World Cup in France. The team is taking on its biggest opponent yet, Sweden - a key match for the U.S. And there's plenty else going on at the tournament.

When it comes to our working lives, there's a point when we're no longer in our prime. But science shows that we hit our peak professionally far sooner than we think we do.

That's the conclusion social scientist Arthur Brooks draws in a new essay in The Atlantic.

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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

California utility giant Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PG&E) has agreed to pay $1 billion to 14 local governments throughout the state for the wildfire damage caused by its equipment and practices.

Attorneys for a group of local public entities — counties and cities — announced the proposed settlement Tuesday to help cover taxpayer losses from the 2015 Butte Fire, the 2017 North Bay Fires and the 2018 Camp Fire.

Copyright 2019 Wyoming Public Radio. To see more, visit Wyoming Public Radio.

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