Weekend Edition

Saturday and Sunday 8am
  • Hosted by Scott Simon, Rachel Martin

Whether revealing events in small-town America or overseas, or profiling notable personalities, Weekend Edition from NPR News appreciates the extraordinary details that make up every story. This two-hour weekend morning newsmagazine covers hard news, a wide variety of newsmakers, and cultural stories with care, accuracy, and a wink of humor.

Weekend Edition Saturday wraps up the week's news and offers a mix of analysis and features on a wide range of topics, including arts, sports, entertainment, and human interest stories. The two-hour program is hosted by NPR's Peabody Award-winning Scott Simon

Weekend Edition Sunday includes the popular Puzzler segment with Will Shorts.  The program is hosted by Rachel Martin.

The 2010s: The Influence Of The Kardashians

Dec 28, 2019

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LEILA FADEL, HOST:

We're ending a celebrity decade. From "Real Housewives" to viral moments to electing a celebrity president, the 2010s have been propelled by reality-star power. And no one exemplifies that more than Kim, Kourtney, Kylie, Khloe, Kendall and Kris.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

It's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Minnesota County Votes Yes To More Refugees

Dec 21, 2019

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Former Google Engineer On Her Firing

Dec 21, 2019

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Kathryn Spiers worked as an internal security engineer at Google for two years. Part of her job was to write browser notifications that notify co-workers of employee guidelines and company policies, like not uploading proprietary documents while they surf the web.

There are scores of holiday stories on streaming services this season, and a lot of them seem rolled out of the same candy cane factory: snow, smiles and the real meaning of love.

As an aficionado of the form, I've tried to sketch out my own version:

Charlayne had an exciting life as managing editor of a Manhattan fashion magazine. But something was missing.

A woman lived in her car in front of our apartment building for a couple of weeks. Our family brought down some food, clothing and a blanket, but the woman hesitated to open her door when we knocked and smiled.

After all, who were we? Why should she trust us?

We did not call police or a city agency to say, "There's a woman living in a car on our street." I've reported stories where I've spent the night in city homeless shelters. They can feel crowded and unsafe, and have little privacy. I can see why someone would choose to stay on the street or in their car.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Ronny Chieng has a Netflix comedy special, "Asian Comedian Destroys America!" It launches globally on Netflix next week in which he holds forth about coming to America, being amazed, agog and occasionally appalled, all at the same time.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

It's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

A Taste Of The Holidays, Cowboy-Style

Dec 14, 2019

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Cowpokes coming in from the open range to party in town is as well-known as BJ Leiderman, who writes our theme music. Christmas was traditionally a time of great cowboy migration. Towns across the country held cowboy Christmas balls under various names, and they still are.

The old way to think about your dog's "human age" — the age in actual years times seven — is wrong. And researchers now have a new formula they think will calculate your dog's age more accurately.

Simply put, compared with humans, dogs age very quickly at first, but then their aging slows down, a lot.

Trey Ideker of the University of California, San Diego was part of a team of researchers that looked at aging on the molecular level.

What makes a banana taped to a wall worth $120,000 to someone?

If it has been put there by the right artist.

This banana was duct-taped to a wall by Maurizio Cattelan, the Italian artist, and it's on display this week at Art Basel in Miami Beach.

The banana is real, by the way, not a sculpture. It will soon go brown, slimy, and may already be ... fragrant.

The Perrotin art gallery of Paris has already sold this piece of produce, and it turns out that $120,000 is practically a bargain. Another banana the artist taped to a wall is going for $150,000.

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Scorpions Infest Brazilian Cities

Dec 7, 2019

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Life in Sao Paulo, Brazil, may feel a little like a science fiction film right now. Scorpions roam the realm. They're finger-sized, armed with two pincers and, of course, a poisonous stinger. And apparently, they're everywhere.

French Entertainer Madeon On 'Good Faith'

Dec 7, 2019

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