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Business Review - Great Foundations

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Companies take risk with clients they trust.  Robert Solomon shares the best form of communication to build trust. 

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ANY BUSINESS STRATEGY INVOLVES RISK. BRAND STRATEGIST AND BUSINESS DEVELOPER, ROBERT SOLOMON SHARES THE IMPORTANCE OF BUILDING CLIENT RELATIONSHIPS, WHEN RISK IS INVOLVED.

“If you're trying to produce great work for clients, most great work entails some degree of risk.  Most companies will only take risks with people they trust. In order to do really, really good work, you've got to build a level of trust.  And if you do build trust, you will be able to produce better work and have better problem resolution with your clients, which in turn reinforces trust.”

SOLOMON SAYS THAT ALTHOUGH TECHNOLOGY CAN BE HELPFUL, RELATIONSHIP BASED TRUST IS BUILT THROUGH FACE-TO-FACE INTERACTIONS.

“Technology is a great facilitator, and it can help you be in more constant touch with more clients than you might otherwise would be. Nothing replaces face-to-face concept.  There is something very potent about sitting across a table or in a conference room, speaking to someone face to face than there is to actually advocating by email or a phone call. Use technology, to supplement what you do, but by no means to replace what you do. Go see your client and make sure you do it frequently enough so that they don't forget you. I think really, really good people in the business of serving clients and customers and companies well believe in the power of in-person contacts.”

BUSINESS REVIEW IS A PRODUCTION OF LIVINGSTON & MCKAY AND THE HANKAMER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY.

C.J. Jackson drives on sunshine and thrives on family, NPR and PBS. She is the assistant dean of communications and marketing at Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business and host of public radio’s “Business Review.” Previously, she was director of marketing communications for a large, multinational corporation. C.J. has two daughters—Bri in San Antonio and Devon in Chicago—and four grandchildren. She lives with a little yellow cat named for an ancient Hawaiian tripping weapon.