Anthony Kuhn

North Korea confirmed Tuesday that it test-launched two short-range ballistic missiles from the west of the country Monday.

SOSEONG-RI, South KoreaA short hike in Seongju county, some 135 miles southeast of Seoul, brings you to the top of a small mountain. To the north, you can see the high-rises of Gumi city. Just in front of you lies a former golf course, with an old clubhouse, some shipping containers on the grass and six mobile missile launchers with their tubes pointing north, toward North Korea.

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Updated October 26, 2021 at 9:28 AM ET

Japan's Princess Mako tied the knot with a commoner and exited Japan's royalty in a marriage that has raised issues of how modern-day Japanese royals are expected to behave, as well as gender equality and human rights in the world's oldest continuous monarchy.

The controversy delayed the marriage by three years. It prompted the pair to skip any formal ceremony, instead just registering their union at a local government office on Tuesday.

JEONGEUP COUNTY, South Korea — A pig's head sits on an offering table. Men in light-green robes and black hats pour liquor and light incense.

They are venerating a ninth century scholar and poet, Choe Chi-won, at a Confucian academy established in his honor over 300 years ago.

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SEOUL — The race to become Japan's next leader looks like a tossup. In the nearly half-century that Tokyo-based journalist Hiroshi Izumi has been covering party politics and elections, "This is the first time that we cannot predict the result until the ballot box will be opened," he says.

When President Biden hosts the leaders of Japan, Australia and India at the White House on Friday, it will be part of a push, analysts say, to reorient U.S. foreign policy away from long wars and traditional alliances in Europe and instead focus on countering a fast-rising foe: China.

The four leaders will be meeting for the second time this year as part of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, or Quad, founded in the aftermath of the 2004 Asian tsunami. In recent years, analysts say the group has emerged as the most important democratic bulwark against China's burgeoning power.

Updated September 3, 2021 at 10:57 AM ET

SEOUL — Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga effectively announced his resignation, after his handling of the coronavirus pandemic cost him public support and dimmed his party's prospects ahead of general elections this fall.

Updated August 27, 2021 at 1:04 PM ET

SEOUL — The Biden administration has to decide by the end of the month whether to renew a ban on U.S. citizens traveling to North Korea, and Americans with relatives in North Korea are eagerly awaiting the decision.

They include Kate Shim, who immigrated to the United States from South Korea in the 1970s. After the Korean War, her uncle was missing and her family believed he was in North Korea.

SEOUL — North and South Korea reconnected hotlines across the demilitarized zone Tuesday, after a nearly 14-month long disconnect.

Both Pyongyang and Seoul hailed the move as a step toward healing strained ties between the rival states, although neither side suggested the move could lead to another round of summitry or progress in stalled nuclear negotiations between Pyongyang and Washington.

Updated August 2, 2021 at 12:13 PM ET

SEOUL, South Korea — Japan is undergoing a remarkable shift in its stance on one of the most contentious issues in Asia: Taiwan.

Mainland China and Taiwan split during a civil war in 1949, and Beijing has vowed to unify with the self-governing island — by force, if necessary. The Biden administration is counting on help from its allies, especially Japan, to deter such a move.

After spending hundreds of millions of dollars to sponsor the Tokyo Olympics, some of Japan's biggest corporations are now canceling advertising, scaling back promotional events, and scrapping plans for executives to attend the upcoming opening ceremony.

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