Brodie Bashaw

Station Manager/ Host, Morning Edition

Brodie has been with KWBU since June 5, 2000. She knows the exact date because it was less than one month before KWBU began broadcasting NPR programming.  Her commercial radio experience coupled with many years in public broadcasting, have given her a good foundation for heading up the on-air side of KWBU's operations. Brodie was raised in a military family; her father's Army stations ranged from Minnesota to Germany, Washington, Nebraska and California. But it is TEXAS she calls home! Brodie has three canine companions and loves being the aunt to 5 nieces and 4 nephews. She also enjoys playing dominos and a vairety of card and board games.  

Ways to Connect

An Artist who helped American painting get past the dominant style of her day get her story told in a new book. 

Last week I mentioned a new biography of artist Helen Frankenthaler entitled Fierce Poise that I’m really looking forward to reading.  Maybe this summer.  Her career was a remarkable one, and her influence on American art very significant.

In 1952 she painted a breakthrough piece called Mountains and Sea.  Because muted color made up so much of the visual impact of her painting, this new style became known as “color field” painting, one of the successor movements to abstract expressionism.  Morris Louis, who became one of Frankenthaler’s fellow “color field”

Telling the story of a woman who moved American painting onward from a once dominant style.

Artist biographies are, for me, a pretty safe bet when it comes to reading material. If it’s about an artist I like, whose work I like, I can get a lot out of a good biography.  There’s a new one out of an artist named Helen Frankenthaler that, while I haven’t got the book yet, is giving me a chance to reflect on her and her work and I’m looking forward to reading it.  She deserves a good 

It’s been called “the Marine Corps Boot Camp of lawyering” and ranked by Princeton Review as “arguably the best training ground in the nation for practical lawyering.” Baylor Law’s legendary Practice Court celebrated its 100th anniversary last year, and in this Baylor Connections, two longtime Baylor Law faculty and graduates examine what make it so special. Brad Toben, Dean M.C. & Mattie Caston Chair of Law and Gerald Powell, Abner V. McCall Professor of Evidence and a  longtime director of the Practice Court, reflect on its impact and share stories to take listeners inside the experience.


Amidst the unprecedented challenges of COVID-19, Baylor University welcomed a record incoming class last fall while maintaining high academic standards. Baylor University Admissions navigated those challenges, which changed numerous aspects of their work, to connect students to Baylor and welcome them in to the family. In this Baylor Connections, Jessica King Gereghty, assistant vice president of enrollment management, examines how it all came together, and shares how new programs like Summer of Discovery and Accelerate help students connect with Baylor before setting foot on campus.


David and Art - "Country AND Western"

Apr 5, 2021

Two styles of music that are often thought of as interchangeable are, in reality, anything but! 

OK, here’s a question for you: What kind of music do they have at Bob’s Country Bunker? Do you know?  According to the wife of the owner, they have both kinds: “Country AND Western.”

If you’re a fan of the 1979 movie The Blues Brothers, you know this is a joke from the film. The audience is amused by her certainty that there are only two kinds of music and that they, at Bob’s, proudly offer both to their patrons.

But the joke also turns on the fact that most people assume that country-western music is one unified thing.  Country music and western music are related, as many genres of 

Matt Quade shares how employees make moral decision in the workplace and what happens when amoral decision are being made from the top. 

WHEN EMPLOYEES ARE FACED WITH A MORAL DECISION IN THE WORKPLACE, THEY LOOK TO THEIR LEADERS ON HOW TO RESPOND.  MATTHEW QUADE, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF MANAGEMENT, SHARES WHAT HAPPENS WHEN LEADERS DO NOT CLEARLY DISCUSS ETHICS WITH THEIR EMPLOYEES AND THE IMPLICATIONS OF AMORAL MANAGEMENT.

“What we find is that amoral management, this lack of leader responsiveness to the goal situations has a negative effect on employees, specifically in the form of decreased moral courage, and then subsequent increased unethical behavior. So an example could be having to turn down something that offered from a 

David and Art - "Ragtime"

Mar 1, 2021

A Texan born shortly after the end of the Civil War was instrumental in creating one of America's most distinctive styles of music.


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Research and teaching are not separate functions of the Baylor experience, but rather inform one another and enhance engaged learning for students. In this Baylor Connections, Dr. Rizalia Klausmeyer, director of the Office of Undergraduate Research in Baylor’s Office of Engaged Learning, describes the impact of research experiences for students and shares ways they can get involved in research across a variety of disciplines.


Baylor Connections - Peter Klein

Feb 5, 2021

Baylor’s Entrepreneurship and Corporate Innovation department is one of the nation’s elite—ranked in the top 10 by U.S. News & World Report, The Princeton Review, and Entrepreneurship magazine for more than a decade. Peter Klein is the W. W. Caruth Chair and Professor of Entrepreneurship at Baylor. In this Baylor Connections, he examines the value of an entrepreneurial mindset in a variety of settings, considers  the impact of COVID-19 on businesses and business leaders, and examines why Baylor Entrepreneurship and Corporate Innovation has established itself as a top national program.


Jazz isn’t the only art form that contains individualism and improvisation.

If you happened to catch my Christmas jazz show last month, you heard me remark about the individualistic character of jazz, even in the context of old tried-and-true Christmas standards. The impulse behind that however is by no means limited to jazz.  Individualism is at the core of all the arts.

It would be too simplistic to say that all art is improvisational Like a jazz solo. But it is accurate to say that all art comes from the workings of the brain of the individual artist. And all artists are different. So when you hear an improvised jazz solo you are 

David and Art - "Starting Over"

Jan 4, 2021

Decades after the start of Modernism, a handful of artists wanted to make art that was part of society again.

We certainly live in unsettled times. Even as the New Year begins and we hope it will be an improvement, not many people are thinking that things are going to instantly return to normal.  On the contrary, we will probably be living with the effects of the crescendoing trauma of the past few years for quite some time.

Those same remarks could have been uttered 100 years ago without changing a single word. Artists in Europe looked around in 1920 and surveyed a society that had been completely uprooted and destroyed.  The most devasting war that anyone could imagine had been followed by a global pandemic that killed more people than the war did.  In the face of this, what were European artists to do? 

A new exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City offers us one possible

Brodie Bashaw

In episode 96 of Downtown Depot, host Austin Meek interviews Dillon Meek, Mayor of Waco. Dillon discusses the City’s ongoing response to the Covid-19 pandemic, projects in the pipeline for downtown, and his visions for a safe and prosperous 2021 in Waco.


Remembering a pianist who created a style of jazz all his own.

I don’t think I would’ve expected an internationally renowned jazzman to have started off in life wanting to be a rancher instead of wanting to play the piano. And it probably isn’t the case very often.  But, it was the case once.

This month is the 100th anniversary of the birth of pianist Dave Brubeck. Brubeck was born in Concord, California on December 6, 1920. His mom taught him and his two older brothers piano lessons. And, as he remembered, his brothers took to music but he did not. He didn’t want to play the piano.  He wanted to follow his dad into ranching.

In the late 1930s, he enrolled in the veterinary program at what’s now the University of the Pacific but apparently his professors recognized something in him even if he did not.  His zoology professor told him to change his major to music and stop wasting both their time.  He graduated in 1942, was drafted into the Army,

On the December edition of the Central Texas Leadership Series, KWBU's Joe Riley talks to Derek Smith.  Derek is the well known public address voice at McLane Stadium and the Ferrell Center as well as radio play-by-play broadcaster for Baylor Baseball.  Derek is also host of Baylor Connections.  This conversation was recorded December 2, 2020 in the KWBU studio.


Baylor Connections - Michael Muehlenbein

Nov 27, 2020

From working on COVID-19 task forces with Baylor University and McLennan County, to partnering with Waco’s Family Health Center to survey the spread of the virus, Michael Muehlenbein’s work has provided insights into the local behavior of a global pandemic. In this Baylor Connections, Muehlenbein, chair and Professor of anthropology at Baylor, analyzes ways we can better understand and slow the spread of COVID-19 and shares why safety measures remain vital heading into the winter.


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