Emma Jacobs

Former WRVO/Central New York reporter for the Innovation Trail.

Emma Jacobs is a native of Boston. She studied history, so she went for more practical training in public radio at NPR member-stations WNYC and WBUR. She helped shape Wired's Haiti Rewired project, a 2010 Knight Batten Innovations in Journalism Awards notable initiative. 

She's contributed to NPR's National Desk, and to Living on Earth, The Environment Report, Only a Game, Voice of America, and Word of Mouth.  She now reports for WHYY in Philadelphia.

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HOPE, British Columbia — A little before dinnertime, people trickle in to sit by the fireplace in the main lodge of Camp Hope, a church retreat center at the foot of forested mountains in this western Canadian province.

They recount how, in late June, a wildfire suddenly sped into their town of Lytton, British Columbia, about 60 miles north.

"It was just a big cloud of like a brown smoke that's creeping up the mountainside there," recalls Alphonse Adams, who belongs to the Indigenous Lytton First Nation.

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Canadian British Columbia experienced both a heat wave and wildfires this past summer. Now it is having record rainfall. Here's Emma Jacobs reporting from the Fraser Valley.

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BRANTFORD, Ontario — Rows of kids' shoes and stuffed animals fill the front steps of the former Mohawk Institute Residential School in this city about an hour and a half's drive southwest of Toronto. Visitors have created this memorial for Indigenous children whose remains were found buried on the grounds of other former boarding schools across Canada.

Geronimo Henry, 84, is a regular fixture at the site, helping tidy up the tributes and speaking with visitors.

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MONTREAL — For the past 30 years, Carol Anniuk has provided accommodation and guides for recreational fishing trips in northwestern Ontario. In normal times, 99% of her clients are American. But more than 15 months after Canada's restrictions on nonessential travel went into effect to slow the spread of COVID-19, Anniuk, the owner of Young's Wilderness Camp, doesn't know when her U.S. clients will be able to cross the border.

MONTREAL — With just over 3% of Canadians fully inoculated against COVID-19, a growing number of America's northern border states and communities have stepped up to offer excess vaccines to Canadians.

Truck driver John Harrower was on the road last month when he heard on the radio that North Dakota had agreed to vaccinate truckers from his home province of Manitoba.

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Canada began administering doses of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine on Monday, with elderly people and front-line workers among the first to receive shots.

In Quebec, 89-year-old Gisèle Lévesque, a resident of the Saint-Antoine nursing home in Quebec City, became the first person in the province hit hardest by the pandemic to receive a vaccine, at around 11:30 a.m.

Federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu appeared outside the Maimonides Geriatric Centre in Montreal in the afternoon, with newly vaccinated 78-year-old Gloria Lallouz.

A large and isolated region of northeastern Canada entered a lockdown this week as cases of COVID-19 creep up in parts of the country with limited access to advanced medical care.

More than 80 cases have been identified this month in Nunavut, where around 39,000 people, predominantly Inuit, live in communities scattered across a territory the size of Mexico. The worst-hit area, Arviat, has 58 cases in a hamlet of fewer than 3,000 people.

The new lockdown started Wednesday and is set to last two weeks.

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