Glenn Robinson

Host of Business of Health Care

Glenn Robinson has been the President of Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Hillcrest since September 2007. He previously held several CEO positions at hospitals in Texas, Oregon, and South Carolina. A Georgia native and graduate of the University of Alabama, Glenn completed graduate school at Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. 

He has more than 30 years experience in hospital and healthcare management, is a Fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives, and has received several professional awards. Most notably, he was named to Tenet Healthcare’s CEO Circle of Excellence in two separate years, and is the recipient of an Achievement Award from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  

Glenn also serves on a number of national and state healthcare policy boards, including the American Hospital Association Board of Trustees. In addition, he serves as Chair of AHA’s Regional Policy Board 7, a member of the Texas Hospital Association Board of Trustees, and has served as Chairman of the THA’s Council on Policy Development. He also serves as an Adjunct Lecturer for both Baylor University and Trinity University and is involved in several non-profit organizations and community councils including Prosper Waco, Pine Cove Christian Camps, Restoration Gateway, and the Greater Waco Chamber of Commerce. 

Glenn and his wife, Rhonda, enjoy spending time with their children: son Josh and his wife Lauren, son Jacob and his wife Melissa, and daughter Sarah Kathryn and her husband Jordan; and three grandsons: Pierce, Caden and Colt.

Good news: A recent analysis of cholesterol levels in children and teens showed improvement. The bad news? Only half of kids had readings considered ideal. Overall, 7 percent of kids had high cholesterol from 2009 to 2016, down from 10 percent a decade earlier. In children, a high cholesterol level means a reading of 200 or above, while an ideal measure is below 170.


Whether its NFL players wearing pink cleats in October for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month or men going the month of November without shaving to raise awareness around men’s health issues, it seems like every month has some sort of health observance – official or unofficial – associated with it.


Genetic tests sold directly to consumers have been growing in popularity. And I’m not just referring to the tests that show your ethnic ancestry, but also those that claim to identify genetic-based health risks. Experts warn that these tests should not be used to inform health decisions without further scrutiny, as the results of these tests can easily be misinterpreted or unreliable.


A common myth about aging is that older adults are burdened by illness and feel lousy much of the time. In fact, the opposite is usually true. Most seniors report feeling distinctly positive about their health. When asked in a federal survey to rate their overall health, 82% of adults ages 65 to 74 described it as excellent, very good or good. By contrast, only 18% described their health as fair or poor. For many, good health means more than the lack of illness or disability.


We hear plenty about healthcare. But what about self-care? Even if you have heard of self-care do you really know what it means? In short, self-care is about taking the time to show yourself some love and take care of your needs and wellbeing. 


Since 2010, there have been an estimated 9.3 to 49 million cases of the flu each year in the United States according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Exactly how many cases there are annually largely depends on the effectiveness of the flu vaccine.


The so-called placebo effect has long triggered interest in the medical community. A placebo is a substance or therapy that has no medical benefit but the patient receiving it thinks that it does. The placebo effect occurs when the patient receiving this fake treatment experiences a beneficial response that is real.


Many women – and couples for that matter – have experienced the heartache that comes with difficulty getting pregnant. An inability to become pregnant may be due to many factors. However, among the most common, is polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS.


Are you planning to have surgery? Did you know your success may depend equally on your surgeon's skill and your dedication to preparation and recovery? A few smart steps a few weeks before a major elective surgery can make a huge difference. 


There are many proven diets out there, and many diet fads that come and go. One of the most talked about - and many would say controversial - diet trends right now is the ketogenic diet, or keto. 

We often worry about how much time our kids spend in front of a screen, and particularly the link between screen time and childhood obesity. But too much screen time isn't just a problem for kids. 


Cancers affecting the body's largest organ, the skin, are by for the most common. So it's no wonder that a growing number of people are concerned about the products they regularly use to care for their skin, and consequently, a growing number of skin care products that bill themselves as safe, or holistic, or natural. 

High blood pressure and high cholesterol have long been two major risk factors for serious conditions such as heart attack and stroke. 


In 2017, the World Health Organization issued a dire warning over the rise of so-called “superbugs,” which are infections resistant to antibiotics that could pose a grave threat to human health. Many leading health systems have responded by taking a more cautious approach encouraging efforts to prevent overprescribing of antibiotics and only using antibiotics when appropriate.

In the face of an epidemic, getting the right treatment to those affected is essential. That’s the thinking behind the new set of guidelines recently adopted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, which aims to make weight loss surgery more readily available to patients suffering from obesity. 


Pages