More Rate Cuts? Powell Says Fed Is Ready To Help Economy Grow Amid Trade Tensions

Updated at 11:35 a.m. ET Signaling the possibility of more interest-rate cuts, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said the central bank will "act as appropriate" to sustain the economic expansion as the trade war with China takes a toll on global growth and the U.S. economy. In prepared remarks Friday to a Kansas City Fed gathering in Jackson Hole, Wyo., Powell said the economy faces "significant risks" and cited several developments that have roiled financial markets in recent weeks....

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Sometimes there's a song so important to you it almost becomes a part of your identity, your signature song. Sue Cochrane, a former judge from Minneapolis, has one.

(SOUNDBITE OF THE O'NEAL TWINS' SONG, "JESUS DROPPED THE CHARGES")

Nailed It: Bringing Science Into Nail Art

15 hours ago

Of all the things I love about being a girl, I love doing nail art the most. But I'm also a scientist, and scientists aren't usually associated with perfectly manicured nails. Nail art became my way of debunking some common stereotypes, including those that associate scientists with being cold or unapproachable.

I got into nail art four years ago after a friend of mine bought a beginner nail art kit. It contained one metal plate with various nail-sized designs etched on the surface – animals, flowers, food – along with nail polish, a scraper and a silicone stamper.

When Temperatures Rise, So Do Health Problems

15 hours ago

A little Shakespeare came to mind during a recent shift in the Boston emergency room where I work.

"Good Mercutio, let's retire," Romeo's cousin Benvolio says. "The day is hot, the Capulets abroad, and, if we meet, we shall not 'scape a brawl."

It was hot in Boston, too, and people were brawling. The steamy summer months always seem to bring more than their fair share of violence.

But the ER was full of more than just brawlers. Heart attacks, strokes, respiratory problems — the heat appeared to make everything worse.

When Lisa and Dan Macheca bought a century-old Methodist church in St. Louis back in 2004, they didn't think much about the cost of heating the place.

Then the first heating bill arrived: $5,000 for a single month.

"I felt like crying," Lisa Macheca said. "Like, 'Oh my gosh, what have I gotten myself into?' "

The federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has a new student loan watchdog, and his appointment is raising questions about who is safeguarding the interests of student borrowers.

Updated at 7:17 p.m. ET

Seven major publishing houses say that Audible, the audiobook company owned by Amazon, is violating copyright law with a planned speech-to-text feature that's set to launch next month. In a lawsuit filed Friday in federal court, the publishers allege that the feature, Audible Captions, repurposes copyrighted work for its own benefit by transcribing audiobooks' narration for subscribers to read along as they listen.

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Some health systems are encouraging select emergency department patients who are stable and don't need intensive round-the-clock care to choose hospital-level care at home rather than remaining in the hospital.


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Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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